Glorious Repetition

I love Sunday school. I know in some circles Sunday school is considered old-fashioned, giving way instead to its hipper sister “life group” or “fellowship group” or some other nomenclature that carefully avoids both “Sunday” and “school.” As I’ve confessed before, I’m a church girl through and through, and, as such, I like Sunday school. I like it on a Sunday and I like that it is a school, presumably of learning.

I first taught Sunday school when I was in college. I was given charge of a group of girls, sixth grade I think, and each Sunday we sat in a circle and discussed the Bible and faith and Jesus. I loved it.

In the years since, I’ve taught middle school girls, college students, and young adults. I currently teach a ladies’ Sunday school class and each Sunday we sit in a circle and discuss the Bible and faith and Jesus and I love it still.

I once heard a famous author and speaker say that her proudest role was that of the lowly Sunday school teacher. Forget the thousands attending her conference or buying her book, it was the role of Sunday school teacher that meant the most. I get that.

Back when I was a young mom teaching middle school girls in Sunday school, I had the auspicious privilege of teaching the book of Job. Not my choice, mind you, but that of the curriculum we had been given. If I recall correctly, the study of Job lasted not one but two full quarters. Yep, six months. Which is no doubt adequate for a careful exposition in an advanced Bible class perhaps or maybe a sermon series. But for middle school girls? An eternity.

I felt as if I were repeating myself. “You know what Job’s friend said last week? He says again. And how Job protests his innocence? Yep, Again.” Or, “Remember when we said God is sovereign even in our struggles? Yeah, that. Again.”

Maybe those middle school girls, for all their talk of boys and clothes and friends, learned something. Evidently I did. Repetition prompts retention, proven by my repetitious teaching in Job over twenty years ago and me still talking about it here today.

I felt much the same way teaching through 1 John in my Tuesday morning Bible study. this spring Not only are the themes of faith, love, and obedience repeated throughout the letter but John often says the same thing, or a slight variation of it, multiple times in his short 5 chapter letter. I once confessed to my friend that I was finding it difficult to get excited about preparing nearly the exact same lesson I’d just taught the week before!

But repetition prompts retention and I daresay one reason John keeps repeating himself is that his readers needed those truths drummed into their heads and hearts over and over and over until they didn’t just know it, they knew it. In fact, he tells them that he is writing so that they may know–be confident of, have a settled conviction that–they have eternal life.

And John writes to me too. As I think over my spiritual journey I am embarrassed by how many lessons I must learn and relearn and relearn, how very repetitive both my sin and the Lord’s gracious instruction are. In fact, John’s threefold emphasis of faith, love, and obedience are the very same areas in which I sense the Lord’s ongoing, repetitive dealings in my own heart and life.

Faith: to what am I holding on for hope? For peace? For security? For joy? For identity? If it is anything other than Christ alone, I am like the false teachers John denounces as deceiving themselves.

Obedience: how often do I choose comfort? Pragmatism? Avoidance of looking (or being) weird? But John asserts that God’s commands are not burdensome but for my good and His glory.

Love: how often am I selfish? Denying the benefit of the doubt? Asserting my rights over another? Indulging in self-satisfaction under the guise of introversion? Over and over and over the Lord is gracious to remind me that He is for and about people and as His child I must be also. I’m ashamed at how easily I forget.

But the grace of the Lord! His mercies are new every morning, an ongoing, repetitive outpouring of forgiveness and redemption and grace that is not without effect. Every Sunday in Sunday school, every Tuesday in 1 John, every day, every hour, He is faithful and His Spirit reminds me over and over and over of my sin, yes, but also of the free forgiveness that is mine in Christ. Over and over and over and over again. I praise God for the glorious repetition of conviction and mercy.

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Author: Lisa Spence

Wife, mother, Bible teacher, bibliophile, occasional blogger

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